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Thomas Nevitt

  • M2/018903, Private, Army Service Corps MT
  • Died of illness, 13 November 1918, aged 27
  • Buried at Terlincthun British Cemetery, France
  • CWGC registered (Husband of Georgina Nevitt, of “Swaledale,” Grove Rd, Harrogate; son of Henry and Sarah Nevitt, of “Sunnyside,” Llandudno Junction, Wales)
  • Llandudno Junction casualty
    • Llanrhos (Deganwy) War Memorial

Thomas Nevitt, the son of a steam engine fitter, Henry Nevitt and his wife Sarah Nevitt (née Shenton) was born at Llangwstennin on 25 February 1891. The family lived at 1 Brookfield Cottage and Thomas was recorded that year as being the youngest of six siblings, the others being: Margaret Ellen, Elsie Annie, Mary Eliza, Joseph Henry, and Selina. In March 1898, Thomas transferred from the Conway Infants’ School to the National School – his home address was recorded as 16 Railway Colleges, Conway. By 1901, the family had moved to 16 Junction Terrace, Llanrhos. The family had been joined by Albert, Catherine and Sarah. Thomas left school in October 1905 to work in a railway shed. In 1911, the family lived at “Sunnyside”, Stanley Oak Terrace, Llandudno Junction. Thomas was now employed as a locomotive fitter apprentice.

Thomas Nevitt volunteered to join the Army Service Corps (Mechanical Transport) in November 1914. His service number was M2/018903. Within a very short space of time, on 10 December 1914, Thomas Nevitt disembarked in France. Thomas’ army career is not well documented though it is noted that he served with the 6th Auxiliary (Petrol) Company, MT which had formed in March 1915, providing local petrol-driven lorry transport in the Boulogne area.

Whilst on home leave on 29 August 1918, Thomas Nevitt married Georgina Georgeson at St. Luke’s Parish Church, Harrogate.

Thomas Nevitt died of influenza and pneumonia on 13 November 1918 at the 3rd Canadian General Hospital, Boulogne. He was buried at Terlincthun British Cemetery.

In 1939, Georgina Nevitt lived at Windsor in Berkshire. She died at Windsor in 1968.

 

Frederick Raymond Newbery

  • 356081, Private, 1/10th The King’s (Liverpool Regiment) (Territorial Force)
  • Died of illness after exposure to poison gas, 25 April 1920, aged 22
  • Buried at the Great Orme’s Head Cemetery
  • CWGC registered (Son of Thomas Bryant Newbery and Rose Newbery, of “Normanhurst”, Maelgwyn Rd, Llandudno)

Frederick Raymond Newbery, the son of Thomas Bryant Newbery and his wife Rose Maud Newbery (née Fothergill) was born in Kennington, London on 16 July 1897. In 1901, the family lived at Cheriton, near Folkestone, Kent. Thomas Newbery was a hotel porter and Frederick had a younger sister Dorris. The family moved to Llandudno and in September 1906, Fred was admitted to St. George’s National School. The school register indicates that Thomas Newbery was working at the Grand Hotel, Llandudno. Fred transferred to Lloyd Street Council School in July 1907 and to John Bright County School in July 1911. The family was now living at “Normanhurst”, Maelgwyn Road. Fred now had a brother, Norman.

From 28 February 1912 until 3 April 1915, he was apprenticed to Lamport and Holt Ltd, a Liverpool shipping line.Frederick Newbery joined the army on 10 April 1915. He enlisted at Liverpool into the 10th (Scottish) Battalion of The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), (Territorial Force). His regimental number was 4457 (later 356081). He signed an agreement to serve overseas that same day. He spent some time in a provisional battalion before joining the 3/10th KLR on 8 October 1915. He embarked for Southampton on 18 November 1915 and joined the 1/10th KLR on 23 November 1915. Fred was gassed on 22 July 1917 and was admitted to 16 General Hospital, Le Tréport on 24 July 1917. Having contracted dysentery, he was evacuated to England on 1 September 1917 and was convalescing in hospital until 9 November 1917. On 20 November 1917, Fred was posted to the 10th (Reserve) Battalion (formerly the 3/10th) KLR at Oswestry and was appointed acting lance corporal on 1 June 1918. He reverted to private on 17 October 1918, the same day as he disembarked in France. He arrived at H Infantry Base Depot at Étaples the following day and re-joined the 1/10th KLR on 1 December 1918. Frederick returned to England on 27 February 1919 and was demobilised on 29 March 1919.

Frederick Raymond Newbery died on 25 April 1920 at 101 Rowson Street, Wallasey aged 22. The cause of death was given as valvular disease of the heart and syncope. Fred’s address was given as “Normanhurst”, Llandudno and his occupation as ship’s officer (Merchant Service). His body was returned to Llandudno and he was buried at the Great Orme’s Head Cemetery.

 

Thomas Rocliffe Nicholls

  • Captain, Territorial Force Reserve, attached 14th Hampshire Regiment
  • Killed in Action, 26 September 1917, aged 41
  • No known grave (Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium)
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)
  • Llandudno casualty
    • Not on Llandudno War Memorials
    • Parents lived at Craig-y-Don from 1909

Thomas  Rocliffe Nicholls, the eldest son of a bank cashier, Thomas Henry Nicholls and his wife Hilda Emma Nicholls (née Culverhouse) of Westgate, Guisborough was born on 24 August 1876. By 1881, the family included a further two sons, John Richard Lee and Raimond Gervase. Daughters Annie and Emily were born in Guisborough but brothers George and Herbert were born in Spalding, Lincolnshire where Thomas Henry had been appointed manager of the National Provincial Bank and in 1891, the family lived at 15 Bridge Street. That year, the family moved again to Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire where Thomas attended Newcastle High School which he left in 1893. In January 1894, Thomas became an apprentice at his father’s bank and two years later was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the 1st Volunteer Battalion of the Prince of Wales’s (North Staffordshire Regiment). In 1898, Thomas resigned his commission because he had been transferred to a Manchester branch. The Census of 1901 described him as a lodger living at 9 Hawthorn Grove, Heaton Norris. The following year saw him as a clerk in the Torrington, North Devon, branch. On 24 October 1907 and described as a bank accountant, Thomas Rocliffe Nicholls married Hilda Emma Culverhouse at Charlcombe, Bath, Somerset. The following year saw the birth of his son Thomas Henry Lee Nicholls and his initiation into the Torridge Masonic Lodge. In 1911, the family lived at 4 New Street, Torrington and the year saw the birth of Cyril George Nicholls. In 1913, Thomas became assistant cashier at the main Southampton branch and it was in this year that his third son, Richard Aubrey Nicholls was born.

In 24 October 1914, Thomas Rocliffe Nicholls was commissioned as a lieutenant into the Territorial Force Reserve. His fourth son John Gervase Nicholls was born in 1915. He had been attached to the Royal Defence Corps (TF) and one of its protection companies when promoted to captain on 14 November 1916. On 16 April 1917, Thomas was attached for duty with the Hampshire Regiment. He landed in France on 2 July 1917 and joined the 14th (Service) Battalion (1st Portsmouth Battalion [or Pompey Pals]) which had been on the Western Front in the 39th Division since March 1916.homas Rocliffe Nicholls, the eldest son of a bank cashier, Thomas Henry Nicholls and his wife Hilda Emma Nicholls (née Culverhouse) of Westgate, Guisborough was born on 24 August 1876. By 1881, the family included a further two sons, John Richard Lee and Raimond Gervase. Daughters Annie and Emily were born in Guisborough but brothers George and Herbert were born in Spalding, Lincolnshire where Thomas Henry had been appointed manager of the National Provincial Bank and in 1891, the family lived at 15 Bridge Street. That year, the family moved again to Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire where Thomas attended Newcastle High School which he left in 1893. In January 1894, Thomas became an apprentice at his father’s bank and two years later was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the 1st Volunteer Battalion of the Prince of Wales’s (North Staffordshire Regiment). In 1898, Thomas resigned his commission because he had been transferred to a Manchester branch. The Census of 1901 described him as a lodger living at 9 Hawthorn Grove, Heaton Norris. The following year saw him as a clerk in the Torrington, North Devon, branch. On 24 October 1907 and described as a bank accountant, Thomas Rocliffe Nicholls married Hilda Emma Culverhouse at Charlcombe, Bath, Somerset. The following year saw the birth of his son Thomas Henry Lee Nicholls and his initiation into the Torridge Masonic Lodge. In 1911, the family lived at 4 New Street, Torrington and the year saw the birth of Cyril George Nicholls. In 1913, Thomas became assistant cashier at the main Southampton branch and it was in this year that his third son, Richard Aubrey Nicholls was born.

On 26 September 1917, the 39th Division was in action on the first day of the Battle of Polygon Wood, a phase of the Third Battle of Ypres or Passchendaele. In the engagement, Thomas Rocliffe Nicholls was killed by shellfire aged 41. Like the majority of British troops who were killed at Passchendaele and who have no known grave, he is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial near Ypres.

In 1939, Hilda Emma Nicholls lived at a private hotel in Bournemouth. She died at Chichester in 1955 and probate was given to her eldest son Thomas Henry Lee Nicholls, a life underwriter.

NOTE

Thomas Rocliffe Nicholls’ parents retired to “Carfax”, Carmen Sylva Road, Craig-y-Don in 1909. His father died on 11 November 1910 and was buried in Llanrhos Churchyard. Thomas’ mother, Annie Elizabeth Nicholls died on 30 November 1933 at Worcester. She was buried in her husband’s grave at Llanrhos Churchyard. A further connection with Llanrhos is that Thomas, as Thomas R Nicholls, is commemorated upon the Llanrhos (Remainder of the Parish section) War Memorial in All Soul’s Church, Deganwy as were many Llandudno men. Crucially, in a biography of her son, Annie Nicholls’ address was given as “Craiglands”, Craig-y-Don, Llandudno which proves that she was living in Llandudno in 1917, possibly later. Her residence within the Urban District of Llandudno should have made Thomas Rocliffe Nicholls eligible for commemoration on the Llandudno memorials.

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