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Edward James

  • 52202, Quartermaster Sergeant, 6 Depot Company Royal Engineers
  • Accidentally killed, 3 December 1916, aged 51
  • Buried at the Great Orme’s Head Cemetery
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)
  • Not a local casualty
    • Died in Llandudno
    • Buried at the Great Orme’s Head Cemetery

Edward James was born at Gorey, Co Wexford in 1865. He was a joiner by trade and served a six-year apprenticeship before joining the army on 16 August 1890. His regimental number in the Royal Engineers was 25047. He married Kathleen Helena Bourne at Aghold in 1895 and both spent some time in India, their sons Herbert Holmes James and Edward Ingram James being born there. Edward James spent nine years in India and one year and four months in the Gold Coast, now Ghana, West Africa.

In 1911, the family lived at Gillingham, Kent. His children, Eva, John William Costello, Norman, Frederick and Ina were all recorded as being born at Chatham. Edward James’ service terminated on 15 August 1911 and though he indicated that he intended to return to Ireland, it he continued to live at Gillingham.

Edward James re-enlisted as a sapper in the Royal Engineers on 18 September 1914 his new regimental number was 52202. He stated his age as 47 though he was in fact 49. He was appointed acting quartermaster sergeant the following day. He was attached to the 64th and the 129th Field Companies and was promoted to acting warrant officer class 1 on 1 April 1915. However, he reverted to quartermaster sergeant on 16 September 1915 having been found fit only for home service duty. He was posted to No 6 Depot Company at Conwy and attached to the RE Training Centre, Deganwy.

On 16 July 1916, another daughter, Olwen James was born at 8 Skinner Street, Gillingham. The informant on the following day was Edward James, presumably at home on leave.

Edward James died in Llandudno Cottage Hospital on 3 December 1916 aged 51 as a result of injuries sustained after being hit by a bus on 25 November at Deganwy whilst off duty. He was buried at the Great Orme’s Head Cemetery.

Edward James’ untimely death was to have very unfortunate consequences. On 20 February 1919, Kathleen James was admitted to the Chatham Workhouse. She was discharged five weeks later but died shortly after. Olwen James’ daughter, Geraldine, recalls that the youngest children were placed in orphanages.

 

Frank Johnson

  • 235231, Petty Officer, HMS Maidstone/Submarine E47, Royal Navy
  • Killed or died as a direct result of enemy action, 20 August 1917, aged 29
  • Body not recovered for burial (Plymouth Naval Memorial)
  • CWGC registered (Son of Frank and Emma Johnson, of Llandudno, Wales; husband of Emma J Broadley [formerly Johnson], of Newsole Farm, Whitfield, Dover)

Frank Johnson’s parents, Alfred Johnson and Emma Johnson (née Adams) came from Staffordshire. They were married at Wolverhampton in 1876 and moved to Llandudno, living at “Anglesey House/Richmond House”, Church Walks – Alfred was described as a grocer’s porter in 1881. Their youngest son, Frank, was born on 4 July 1889 at Llandudno. In 1891 the family of eight lived at “Anglesey House”, Alfred being described as a car driver. In July 1892, Frank was admitted to St. George’s National School, Llandudno. In 1901, Alfred was described as a driver groom.

Aged 16, Frank joined the Royal Navy on 7 November 1905 as a boy 2nd class”, his period of engagement being 12 years from his 18th birthday. From his naval record, it appears that he first trained on HMS Emerald, stationed at Queenstown (Cobh) in Ireland though he soon moved to Devonport where he rotated between various training establishments and sea duties. The latter included HMS Implacable in the Mediterranean Fleet (1907) and HMS St. George on the South African Station (1908). He attended HMS Defiance, a torpedo school, in 1909 and later duties included HMS Collingwood on the Home Fleet (1911), HMS Ajax on the Grand Fleet (1913) and the submarine depot ship HMS Forth (1912 & 1914).

On 15 December 1914, Frank married Emma Jane Miller at the Parish Church of St. John, Torquay. The marriage register records that his residence was HM Submarine C15 and his rank as able seaman. The following year, he was posted to the submarine depot ship HMS Thames stationed at Harwich. In 1916, he was promoted to petty officer and in 1917 was transferred to another submarine depot ship at Harwich, HMS Maidstone and the 9th Submarine Flotilla. One of the submarines was E47, laid down at Govan in May 1916 and commissioned in October of that year. E47 was lost with all hands, including Frank Johnson aged 29, in the North Sea on 20 August 1917. The wreck was discovered in 2002 about six nautical miles north-west of the Friesian Island of Texel. Divers concluded that the submarine had probably hit a mine though this has not been officially acknowledged.

Emma Jane Johnson married Herbert Broadley in 1919 in Kent; they had two children, Frank and Mary.

 

Alun Jones

  • 36497, Private, 17th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Killed in action, 31 July 1917, aged 24
  • No known grave (Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Belgium)
  • CWGC registered (Son of Robert and Sarah Ellen Jones, of “York Villa”, 28 Clifton Rd, Llandudno)
  • Brother of Thomas Ivor Jones

Alun Jones, the son of Robert and Sarah Ellen Jones (née Davies), was born in Llandudno on 24 December 1893. He attended Lloyd Street Council School. In 1901, the family including Alun and Thomas Ivor (qv) lived at “Ringwood House”, Deganwy Street, Llandudno; Robert Jones was a shopkeeper. Alun later attended John Bright County School. In 1911, the family lived at “York Villa”, Clifton Road; Robert Jones was a grocer and Alun a hosier and outfitter’s apprentice.

Alun Jones enlisted at Birkenhead into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. His service number was 36497, close to that of Alun Davies Jones (next) which suggests his date of enlistment was early November 1915. The soldiers’ training and dates of embarkation might also be similar. On arrival in France, Alun was posted to the 17th (Service) Battalion RWF. The 17th RWF had formed at Llandudno in February 1915 and had been in France as part of the 38th (Welsh) Division since December 1915. The division had received a severe mauling at Mametz Wood in July 1916.

Alun Jones went missing in action on 31 July 1917 aged 24. This was the day when the 38th (Welsh) Division was engaged in the Battle of Pilckem Ridge, the first phase of the Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Hoping that Alun had been taken as a prisoner of war, enquiries were made to the International Red Cross by Llandudno’s Wesleyan Minister, Mr J Lloyd. The search proved fruitless and Alun Jones is recorded as having been killed in action on 31 July 1917. He has no known grave. He was one of three soldiers from Llandudno killed that day.

 

Alun Davies Jones

  • 36799, Lance Corporal, 14th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Died of wounds, 11 July 1916, aged 20
  • Buried at Morlancourt British Cemetery No 1, France
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)

Alun Davies Jones was born in Llangystennin on 21 January 1896. His father was Robert Thomas Jones, a grocery provision dealer, and his mother was Maria Elizabeth Jones (née Davies). In 1901, the family lived at 1 Stanley Oak Terrace, Llandudno Junction. In November 1903, Alun was admitted to Lloyd Street Council School; he transferred to John Bright County School in 1909. In 1911, the family lived at “Broncoed”, St. Mary’s Road, Llandudno; Robert Jones was the relieving officer and registrar of the Board of Guardians. After leaving school, Arthur became a clerk to the Board.

Enlisting at Llandudno, Alun Jones joined the 20th (Reserve) Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers on 9 November 1915. His service number was 36799. The battalion had formed earlier in the year to train subalterns and other ranks as reinforcements for those battalions in the front line. The battalion was based at Kinmel Park. On his attestation papers, Alun was described as the assistant clerk to the Board of Guardians. Alun was promoted to lance corporal on 18 December 1915.

On 29 March 1916, Alun Jones embarked for France at Folkestone. He joined the 38th Infantry Base Depot at Étaples the following day and joined his new unit, the 14th (Service) Battalion near Givenchy on 11 April 1916. The battalion had been in France since December 1915 and was under the orders of the 38th (Welsh) Division.

Alun Jones was wounded by shrapnel on 10/11 July 1916 in the attack on Mametz Wood during the Battle of Albert, a phase of the Battle of the Somme. He died of his wounds aged 20 on 11 July at 21 Field Ambulance (7th Division). He is buried at Morlancourt British Cemetery No 1. He left his effects to Miss Ceinwen Roberts of “Mor Awel”, South Parade, Llandudno.

 

Arthur Jones

  • G/22407, Lance corporal, 2nd Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment
  • Died of illness, 19 March 1917, aged 22
  • Buried at Wimereux Communal Cemetery, France
  • CWGC registered (Son of Mr and Mrs David Jones, of “Thornycroft” Clifton Rd, Llandudno)

Arthur Jones, the son of David and Mary Jones, was born at Llanrhos on 23 December 1894. In 1901, the family lived at 4 Clifton Road, Llandudno – David Jones was a coach driver/groom. In September of that year, Arthur attended Lloyd Street School, leaving it in February 1908. In 1911, David Jones was described as a labourer at the gasworks and Arthur a hairdresser’s assistant.

On the outbreak of the Great War, Arthur Jones was aged 19. His service record no longer exists but it is known that he enlisted at Llandudno. He spent some time with the 7th Reserve Cavalry Regiment, his regimental number being 17226 which was issued in about August 1916. Whether or not Arthur Jones was transferred in from another unit is unknown though a soldier with a close number had, from January 1915, served with the Welsh Horse. The 7th Reserve Cavalry Regiment had formed at Tidworth, Salisbury Plain in August 1914, training men for both the Lancers and the Yeomanry. It is not known if Arthur was on the regiment’s strength as a future cavalryman or as part of its establishment though like many men in the Cavalry Reserve, Arthur Jones was converted to infantry before being sent overseas.

Arthur Jones died of pneumonia on 19 March 1917 aged 22 in France whilst in the 2nd Battalion of the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment. Though the 2nd RWS was a regular infantry battalion, his service number of G/22407 indicates that his service was for the duration of the war. Because he was not awarded any medals, his time in France since disembarkation would have been less than less than 28 days. Because he was buried at Wimereux Communal Cemetery, then it is most likely that he died at Wimeraux, 5 km north of Boulogne, which was an important hospital centre.

 

Edward Jones

  • 36798, Private, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Killed in action, 15 May 1917, aged 26
  • No known grave (Arras Memorial, France)
  • CWGC registered (Son of Jemima Jones, of “Pittsburg”, Clifton Rd, Llandudno, and the late Edward Jones)

Edward Jones was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA on 19 January 1891. His parents, Edward Jones and Jemima Jones (née Williams) were both from North Wales and had emigrated to the United States after their marriage in 1887. The next record found for Edward (junior) is the Census of Wales for 1901: aged 10 living with his mother, now widowed, and maternal grandmother at “Pittsburgh”, Clifton Road, Llandudno. Ten years later, Edward still lived with his mother and was recorded as a printer (compositor).

Edward Jones attested to join the army on 9 November 1915. He joined the 20th (Reserve) Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Conwy the following day with a regimental number of 36798. He was posted to the 13th (Service) Battalion RWF which was serving on the Western Front on 17 March 1916. He received a gunshot wound to the left shoulder on 10 July 1916 during the attack on Mametz Wood and was evacuated to England four days later. He was admitted to the Second Western General Hospital, Manchester on 15 July 1916 and discharged on 28 September 1916. He was posted to the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion on 8 October 1916 and disembarked on 4 March 1917 in France and proceeded to No 5 Infantry Base Depot at Rouen. He joined the 1st Battalion RWF on 24 March 1917.

Initially listed as missing, Edward Jones was killed in action aged 26 during the Second Battle of Bullecourt, a phase of the Arras offensive, on 15 May 1917. He was reported as buried by the CO of the 2/6th London Regiment but presently has no known grave and is remembered on the Arras Memorial.

 

Edward Owen Jones

  • 20163, Private, 14th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Killed in action, 5 June 1916, aged 33
  • No known grave (Loos Memorial, France)
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)

Edward Owen Jones, the son of Joseph Park Jones and Mary Jones, was born in Llandudno on 26 October 1882. In April 1891, the family lived at 16 Clifton Road. Joseph Jones was described as a plasterer. Edward attended Lloyd Street National School which he left in 1896 to become an errand boy. In 1901, the family lived at 14 Council Street – both Joseph and Owen being described as plasterers. In 1904, Edward Jones married Jane Ellen (Jennie) Owen. It appears that the couple originally may have lived in Bethesda because their two children, Edward and Jennie, were both born there in 1905 and 1908 respectively. However, in 1911, the family lived at 24 Kings Road, Llandudno.

Edward Jones enlisted into the 14th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers which formed at Llandudno in November 1914. His regimental number was 20163. The battalion moved to Winchester before disembarking at Le Havre on 2 December 1915. He was killed in action on 5 June 1916 near Laventie in northern France aged 33. According to the war diary, there were some casualties that day during skirmishes into the German lines. He has no known grave.

With Jones being such a common surname, it has proved difficult to determine what happened to Edward Jones’ family. His son Edward married Frances M Tyson in 1935 and they had a son Harold Bernard Jones (1936-1986).

 

Edwin Jones

  • 20162, Private, 18th or 20th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Later TR/4/24849, 63rd Training Reserve Battalion
  • Died of illness after discharge, 22 June 1917, aged 47
  • Buried at Pontbleiddyn (Christ Church) Cemetery
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)

Edwin Jones, the son of Edwin Jones, a carter, was born in Leeswood, Flintshire in 1870. He became a collier and on 1 October 1898 he married Elizabeth Jane Phillips at Christ Church, Pontbleiddyn. Their son Leonard Pierce Jones was born in Chester in September 1899. The Census of Wales for 1901 records the family living at “Tennis Court Lodge”, Victoria Street, Llandudno, Edwin being described as in the coal trade. A daughter Eleanor May Jones was born at Llandudno in 1905. In 1911, the family lived at “Fern Lea”, Queen’s Road, Craig-y-Don. Edwin worked as a general labourer at the gasworks.

Judging from his original service number of 20162, Edwin joined the Royal Welsh Fusiliers in November 1914, enlisting at Llandudno. Edward Owen Jones (previous page) had a consecutive regimental number and he joined the 14th (Service) Battalion. At the age of 46, Edwin was over-age even if he had served previously in the Army. In any event, Edwin was posted to a Reserve Battalion. According to Soldiers Died in the Great War, he served with the 18th (Reserve) Battalion and according to the Commonwealth War Grave commission, he served with the 20th (Reserve) Battalion. The discrepancy makes little material difference as the 18th and 20th RWF, both at Kinmel Park, amalgamated on 1 September 1916 to become the 63rd Battalion of the Training Reserve, losing its affiliation with the RWF. Because he was now in a different corps, Edwin was renumbered TR/4/24849. He was discharged on 14 January 1917.

Edwin Jones became a labourer at a steel works in Middlesbrough and died of pneumonia at 40 March Road, Middlesbrough on 22 June 1917 aged 47. His body was taken to Pontbleiddyn for burial. An interesting aside is that in the Registry of Soldiers’ Effects, there is a claim of £2 18s 11d (£2.95) “on a/c of funeral expenses” made by C Relph. (Cuthbert Relph was an undertaker in Middlesborough.) Edwin’s effects were received by his widow, Elizabeth. Because he is recorded in the CWGC register (as TF/4/24849 63rd TR) and has a CWGC headstone (marked 20162 RWF, the RWF being considered more heroic), his death would have been regarded as being partially attributable to his service. There is no evidence that Edwin had received a Silver War Badge.

Edwin Jones’ son Leonard joined the Royal Navy in 1918 and married Ada G Cross in 1927; he died at Llandudno in 1964. Eleanor May Jones married David Robert Hughes in 1926; she died in 1944.

 

Frederick William Jones

  • 5784, Private, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Killed in action, 16 May 1915, aged 22
  • No known grave (Le Touret Memorial, France)
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)
  • Brother-in-law of John James Whewell

Frederick William Jones, the son of John and Mary Jones was born in Llandudno on 26 April 1893. Four years later, he was admitted to St. George’s National School, his home address being given as “Holywell House”, Llandudno. In 1901, John Jones was described as a town porter and the family lived at “Refane”, Llandudno; Frederick had four siblings: Rose, Jack, Primrose (wife of John James Whewell [qv]) and David. Ten years later, the family lived at 6 Tyn-y-Coed, Great Orme; Fred was described as a fisherman and he had another four younger siblings: Mary, Gwen, Eleanor and Alan.

For a period before the Great War, Frederick Jones served in the Welsh (Carnarvonshire) Royal Garrison Artillery of the Territorial Force. This service had terminated when on 31 August 1914, Frederick Jones volunteered to join the Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Llandudno. He gave his age as 23 although he was only 21, possibly because he had joined the Territorial Force when under-age. His stated trade was as a boatman and he gave his next of kin as John Jones, of “Anglesea Villa”, Great Orme. He was mobilised the same day at Wrexham into the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion with a regimental number of 5784.

The 1st Battalion RWF had been in Malta at the outbreak of war and disembarked at Zeebrugge on 7 October 1914. The battalion suffered severe casualties during the First Battle of Ypres on 30 October 1914. Frederick was probably in either a draft of 303 reinforcements that arrived on 11 November or a draft of 151 on the following day.

Frederick Jones was killed in action on 16 May 1915 aged 22 at the Battle of Festubert. The war diary for that day records the casualties of the other ranks: killed – 118, wounded – 271, missing – 164, wounded and missing – 6. Frederick Jones has no known grave.

 

Henry (Harry) Jones

  • SR/8054, Private, 2nd King’s Shropshire Light Infantry
  • Killed in action, 25 May 1915, aged circa 41
  • No known grave (Ypres [Menin Gate] Memorial, Belgium)
  • CWGC registered (Father of John Jones, of 62 King’s Rd, West Shore, Llandudno)

Harry Jones was born in Llanrhos circa 1874. He was the son of Owen and Mary Jones. Owen Jones was a labourer and sometime town porter. The couple had lived in Pen-y-ffrith and Bodarfon Row, Llandudno and Harry’s elder siblings were William, George, Mary Jane, Thomas Hugh and John. Harry’s younger brother Alfred was born in 1877 and it was at that time when Mary Jones died. In 1881, John, Harry and Alfred were inmates at the Conway Union Workhouse. At the same time, Owen Jones and George lived at “Pen-y-buarth”, Great Orme’s Head. Ten years later, Owen Jones and his son Alfred were living at the same address – no record for that year has been found for Harry.

On 30 September 1893, Harry enlisted into the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry at Chester with a regimental number of 4158. He stated that his next of kin was his father, Owen Jones, of “Penybuarth”, Great Orme’s Head. He joined the Depot at Shrewsbury the following day and was posted to the 1st Battalion on 20 December 1893. His medical record indicates that he received treatment at Shrewsbury, Cork, Portland, Gosport, and Netley. He was posted to the 2nd Battalion on 24 September 1896 and sailed to India on the SS Victoria, landing on 26 October 1896. On 7 January 1897 at Calcutta, it was recommended that he be discharged from the army because of persistent blepharitis, an inflammation of the eyelids. He returned to England via Bombay on the SS Britannia and was admitted to Netley Hospital on 5 March 1897. He was discharged on 30 March 1897. Notwithstanding having been discharged for being permanently unfit, at a time unknown, Harry enlisted into the Special Reserve of the KSLI at Liverpool with a regimental number of SR/8054. Special reservists did six months training with the army and thereafter three or four weeks per year.

In 1901, Harry (as Henry Jones) boarded at 63 Morecambe Street, Walton on the Hill, Liverpool; he was described as a bricklayer’s labourer. On 2 August 1903, Harry (as Henry) married Lillian Gately at St. Nicholas’ Church, Liverpool. He gave his address as 27 Old Hill Street and his age as 27. The 1911 Census records the couple and three children: Lily Margaret; John and Miriam Brooks living at 13 Whitby Street, Liverpool. Another daughter, May, was born shortly after the census was taken. Lilian Jones died in 1914.

After the declaration of war, Harry was mobilised. He disembarked in France on 19 May 1915, apparently destined for the 1st Battalion KSLI that had been in France since 10 September 1914. In the event, the 1st went to Salonika and Harry joined the 2nd Battalion that had still been in India at the outbreak of war, landing at Le Havre on 21 December 1914. Harry probably joined the 2nd in a draft of reinforcements on 21 May 1915 whilst at bivouac at Busseboon. Harry’s was a short war for he was killed in action aged about 41 on 25 May 1915 during the Second Battle of Ypres. The battalion had been ordered to retake a trench lost previously but the attack failed with about 200 casualties. Harry’s body was never knowingly recovered, and he has no known grave. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial at Ypres.

 

Henry James Jones

  • 16590, Private, 13th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Killed in action, 15 May 1916, aged 29
  • Buried at Royal Irish Rifles Graveyard, Laventie, France
  • CWGC registered (Son of Mr. H. Jones, of “Woodleigh,” Trinity Street, Llandudno)
  • Deganwy casualty

Henry James Jones, the son of Henry and Elizabeth Jones, was born in Bootle on 13 August 1886. In the Census of 1891, Henry Jones (senior) was described as a timekeeper man and the family lived at 52 Grey Street, Bootle. Henry had an elder brother John and a younger sister Elizabeth. The family moved to North Wales and in 1897, Henry James Jones was registered at Deganwy National School. In 1901, the family lived at “Bryn Serriol”, Llanrhos; Henry being described as a manager to a builders’ merchant. He had had another two sons: Thomas and William. Henry Jones was a member of the Liberal Party and became a Caernarvonshire County Councillor. By 1911, the family had been joined by another daughter, Gwendoline. Henry James Jones was described as a forwarding clerk and traveller and the family lived at “Maelor”, Deganwy.

On or about 27 October 1914, Henry James Jones enlisted at Conwy into the 13th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The battalion had formed at Rhyl on 3 September 1914 and was known in turn as the North Wales Comrades, the North Wales Pals, and the 1st North Wales. Unlike earlier Service Battalions of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers which had been formed at Wrexham by the War Office, the 13th was formed by the Denbigh and Flint Territorial Force Associations. In November 1914, the battalion moved to Llandudno as a component of the short lived “Welsh Army”, eventually coming under the orders of the 38th (Welsh) Division. In August 1915, the battalion moved to Winnal Hill Camp near Winchester for further training. The battalion disembarked in France on 2 December 1915 though Henry James Jones did not disembark with it. His first recorded unit in France was an infantry base depot from which he was posted back to the 13th RWF.

According to all records, Henry James Jones was killed in action on 15 May 1916. However, the War Diary for the 13th RWF indicates that the battalion that day was in billets at Laventie, in the Brigade Reserve and no casualties were recorded. It is possible that Henry had been attached to another battalion – for example, the 14th RWF had relieved the 13th a couple of days previously and saw some action on 15 May. Aged 29, Henry James Jones was buried at the Royal Irish Rifles graveyard at Laventie.

 

Hugh Jones

  • 37234, Private, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Killed in action, 23 July 1917, aged 26
  • No known grave (Arras Memorial France)
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)

Hugh Jones was the son of a farm carter, Owen Jones and his wife Ellen. Hugh was born at Llechylched near Bryngwran on Anglesey in 1893. In 1901 the family lived at “Gorsgoch”, Llechylched. Hugh was described as at school and he had a younger sister Lizzie. Ten years later, he was labouring on the farm. On 22 November 1915, Hugh married Jane Hughes at Christ Church, Llandudno.

A week later on 29 November 1915, Hugh Jones joined the Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Llandudno. He gave his Anglesey address though his wife’s address was given as 15 Alexandra Road, Llandudno. He reported to the 20th (Reserve) Battalion at Conwy the following day. His infantry training was carried out at Kinmel Bay and he embarked for France on 19 April 1916 at Folkestone, reporting to 38 Infantry Base Depot at Étaples the following day. He joined the 10th (Service) Battalion on 13 May 1916.

On 26 June 1916, Hugh Jones’ son Glyn Kitchener Jones was born in Llandudno.

Hugh was initially reported missing during an attack on Delville Wood on 20 July 1916 and was admitted to hospital three days later at Rouen with shell shock. Once declared fit, he joined the 14th (Service) Battalion at Poperinge on 7 August 1916 – one of many reinforcements to replace men lost at Mametz Wood. On 31 October 1916, Hugh received either a gunshot wound or a shell wound to the right arm and shoulder (the war diary relates some casualties due to an incoming shell) near Ypres. He was evacuated by 129 Field Ambulance, 46 Casualty clearing Station (Mendinghem), 32 Base Hospital (Wimeraux) and HMHS St. David to Queen Mary’s Military Hospital at Whalley, near Clitheroe, Lancashire where he was admitted on 12 November 1916 – the same day as he was officially posted to the RWF depot.

Hugh was discharged from hospital on 29 December 1916 and posted to the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion on 9 January 1917. Though the 3rd RWF was based at Litherland, near Liverpool, it would appear he was attached to one of the other Reserve Battalions at Kinmel Bay – possibly on compassionate grounds. Once judged fit for action, Hugh was posted to the 2nd Battalion, arriving in France on 16 June 1917. However, his orders were changed and after spending some days at 5 Infantry Base Depot, he was posted to the 1st Battalion which he joined on 6 July in a draft of 100 reinforcements.

Hugh Jones was killed in action on 23 July 1917 whilst the battalion was holding the line just to the south-east of Arras. He was one of four killed that day and aged 26. He has no known grave but is remembered on the Arras Memorial.

Hugh’s widow Jane later married William Owen, brother of Enoch Owen (qv).

 

Hugh Owen Brockley Jones

  • 20092, Private, 14th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Killed in action, 1 or 2 September 1917, aged 35
  • No known grave (Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium)
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)

Hugh Owen Brockley Jones was born in Llandudno on 4 May 1882. He was the son of Francis Jones, a plasterer, and his wife Ellen Jones (née Thomas). In 1891, the family lived at “Tanynant”, (Cwlach Street or thereabouts), Llandudno. Francis Jones died in 1892, his home address noted as Cocoa Stores, Madoc Street. Hugh attended St. Beuno’s and St. George’s Schools. In 1901, Ellen and six of her children lived at “Grove Cottage”, Back Tudno Street, Hugh being described as a labourer with the urban district council. In 1902, Hugh married Sarah Jane Davies. In 1911, the family, now including Nelly and John lived in the home of Sarah’s widowed mother Catherine at 18 Madoc Street; Hugh was described as a carriage cleaner for the London and North Western Railway. Because Hugh Jones is not remembered on the L&NWR’s Roll of Honour, he may have left the company and been employed elsewhere.

In mid-November 1914, Hugh Jones volunteered to join the 14th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Llandudno. His service number was 20092. On 5 May 1915, another son, Hugh Owen Jones was born at Llandudno. The 14th RWF moved to Winchester in July 1915 and disembarked at Le Havre on 2 December 1915. On or before 31 July 1917, Hugh Jones received a gunshot wound to the left arm. He was evacuated through No 46 Casualty Clearing Station at Mendinghem to the 18th General Hospital at Camiers, recently taken over by the US Army. On 8 August, he was transferred to No 6 Convalescent Depot at Étaples.

Surviving records indicate that Hugh Owen Jones was killed in action on 2 September 1917 aged 35. However, the battalion’s War Diary indicates that there were no casualties that day though it does record a major incident the previous day when a bomb in a forward command post exploded near Langemark, killing many signallers; perhaps Hugh had been employed on light duties. Commonwealth War Grave Commission records indicate that five members of the battalion have a date of death of 1 September and 18 have a date of death of 2 September. Many of the bodies were entombed, some never identified, and it appears that the later date was assumed for those entombed. Hugh is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

In 1939, a widow, Sarah J Jones lived 2 Mowbray Road Llandudno. Unfortunately, her date of birth is obscured preventing positive identification. Hugh’s son Hugh Owen Jones lived with his wife Laura (née Williams) at “Swinglehurst Lodge No 2”, Deganwy Road, Llandudno.

 

Idwal Jones

  • 66104, Private, 1/6th Cheshire Regiment (Territorial Force)
  • Died of wounds, 14 April 1918, aged 19
  • Buried at St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)

Idwal Jones, the son of John and Grace Jones, was born in Llandudno on 18 January 1899. John Jones was a plasterer and in 1901, the family lived at 4 Maes y Facrell Cottages, Great Orme’s Head. In August 1909, Idwal transferred from St. George’s National School to Lloyd Street School. In 1911, the family lived at the same address and Idwal was described as at school as were two of his three sisters. He left school in November 1913.

On 6 March 1917, a few weeks after his 18th birthday, Idwal was called up and signed on at Bangor. His army record states that his trade was as a labourer. His call-up was approved the following day at Wrexham, and he was posted to the 59th Training Reserve Battalion with a number of TR/4/9390 which he joined on 8 March 1917 at Kinmel Park. His unit was re-designated as the 213th Infantry Battalion on 16 July 1917. His record indicates that he was at Portacarron Camp, Co Galway on 14 September 1917. On 1 November 1917, his unit was again re-designated as the 51st (Graduated) Battalion, Training Reserve (Cheshire Regiment). On 3 January 1918, he was at Gough Barracks, Armagh when he was transferred to the Cheshire Regiment, BEF, France. Idwal disembarked in France on 19 January 1918, a day after his 19th birthday, and was initially slated for the 11th (Service) Battalion with a new service number of 66104 though this was almost immediately changed to the 1/6th Battalion, (Territorial Force).

Idwal Jones received a gunshot wound to the head during the German Spring Offensive of 1918. He was at one time reported missing but was admitted to 2/2nd East Lancashire Field Ambulance on 28 March 1918 and then to 1 Australian General Hospital at Rouen two days later. He died of his wounds on 14 April 1918 aged 19. He was buried at St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen.

 

Ivor Jones

  • 18835, Private, 16th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Died of wounds, 15 July 1916, aged 22
  • Buried at St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France
  • CWGC registered (Husband of A H Jones, of “Rock View”, Victoria Avenue, Llandudno)

Ivor Jones was born in 1894 at Pontllanfraith, Monmouthshire. He was the son of Joseph Jones and Sarah Maria Jones (née Lewis).  In 1901, the family lived at 15 Mount Street, Tredegar. Joseph Jones was a colliery ostler (below ground). Ivor had an elder brother Albert. In 1911, the family lived at Cwmbrynan Farm, Pontllanfraith, Joseph Jones being described as a farmer and Ivor as at boarding school.

Ivor Jones was recruited into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Newport. He joined the 16th (Service) Battalion at Llandudno in December 1914 with a service number of 18835. The battalion had formed at Llandudno the previous month and it moved down to Winchester in August 1915 to continue its training with the 38th (Welsh) Brigade.

On 3 November 1915, Ivor Jones married Ann Harrison Williams at Holy Trinity Church, Llandudno. Ivor gave his address as Winnal Down Camp, Winchester.

Ivor Jones disembarked with his battalion in France in December 1915. He was wounded in action on the attack at Mametz Wood, part of the Battle of the Somme, on 10 July 1916 when the 38th (Welsh) Brigade received a severe mauling. He was admitted to 34 Casualty Clearing Station with a compound fracture of the left knee and haematoma. He was evacuated two days later by 9 Ambulance Train to a hospital at Rouen, over 100 miles away but succumbed to his wounds on 15 July aged 22. He is buried at St. Sever Cemetery.

Sadly, Ivor Jones was never to see his daughter Elizabeth May who had been born on 8 May 1916. Ann Jones never remarried and in 1939 was living with her widowed mother and brother in Craig-y-Don. She died in 1981.

 

Jack Jones (RWF)

  • 20032, Private, 14th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Died of wounds, 25 October 1918, aged 21
  • Buried at Étaples Military Cemetery, France
  • CWGC registered (Son of Thomas and Katherine Jones, of 3 Kings Rd, West Shore, Llandudno, Carnarvonshire. Native of Llandudno)

Jack Jones, the son of Thomas and Catherine Jones was born at Llandudno on 3 December 1896. In 1901, the family lived at 35 Jubilee Street, Llandudno, Thomas Jones being described as a gas stoker. Jack attended Lloyd Street School, leaving on 2 December 1910. The following year records that Jack was a milkman, as were his brothers Harry and Thomas.

Jack Jones enlisted into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers in November 1914 still aged 17. His regimental number of 20032 indicates that he should have been in a batch of volunteers destined for the 14th (Service) Battalion. However, the 14th RWF landed in France in December 1915 and Jack’s medal index card notes that he was not in receipt of the 1915 Star which means he disembarked in France in 1916 or later. The medal index roll shows that his first posting on disembarkation was to an infantry base depot (as a reinforcement) and his first battalion was the 15th RWF (which had also landed in France in December 1915). Why Jack Jones’ posting to the Western Front was delayed is unknown, but it could have been because he had joined up underage. When he was posted to the 14th RWF is unknown, as is the time he was fatally wounded in action.

Jack Jones died of wounds on 25 October 1918 aged 21. He was buried at Étaples Military Cemetery. Étaples is a town on the French coast and was the site of numerous British and Empire infantry base depots and hospitals. Both the 14th and 15th RWF were components of the 38th Welsh Division which saw heavy fighting at Mametz Wood in 1916 during The Battle of The Somme. The division was also involved in the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917, and in 1918 was again in action on The Somme in the Battles of The Hindenburg Line and the final advance in Picardy.

 

John Jones (Merchant Marine)

  • Able Seaman, HMHS Llandovery Castle, Mercantile Marine
  • Supposed drowned after enemy action, 27 June 1918, aged 60
  • Body not recovered (Tower Hill Memorial)
  • CWGC registered (Son of the late Owen and Jane Jones [Nee Hughes)]. Born at Llandudno)
  • Llandudno casualty
    • Not on Llandudno’s Roll of Honour
    • Not on Llandudno War Memorial
    • Not in Memorial Chapel, Holy Trinity Church

John Jones, the son of Owen Jones, a stone mason, and Jane Jones (née Hughes) was born on 3 September 1857 in Llandudno. In 1861, the family lived at 19 Pen-y-buarth, Llandudno; Owen Jones was now an agricultural labourer. Also recorded that year were his wife Jane, his son John, his daughter, and his baby son Hugh. In 1871, the family lived at Maes-y-facrell, Llandudno. Owen Jones died in 1877 and Jane Jones married William Morris, a labourer, in 1881. The census for that year shows the combined family living at Maes-y-facrell Cottages though John Jones, who would have now been 23 years of age, was not recorded.

Though not proven to be the John Jones of this research, in November 1875, a John Jones born in Llandudno with a given age of 16 (ie born 1857/8) became bound to the Charles Myers Steamship Company of Liverpool for five years. Liverpool crew lists include John Jones, an able seaman born in Llandudno between 1855 and 1857 who resided in East Street and Jenkinson Street, Liverpool and who served on several ships of the White Star Line: Cymric, Ionic and Majestic.

What is known for certain is that the John Jones of this biography was an able seaman aboard the hospital ship HMHS Llandovery Castle when it was torpedoed by the German U-boat U-86 on 27 June 1918 off the coast of Ireland en route to England from Nova Scotia. The Llandovery Castle was a liner built in 1914, operated by the Union Castle Line and was commissioned as a hospital ship in July 1916, assigned to the Canadian Forces. Firing on a hospital ship was against international law and the skipper of the U-boat sought to destroy evidence by ramming lifeboats and machine-gunning survivors. Twenty-four people were rescued. According to the Board of Trade register, Deaths at Sea, John Jones’ home address was 22 Earle Road, Edge Hill, Liverpool.

Although CWGC records John Jones’ parents as being “the late Owen Jones and Jane Jones (née Hughes)”, Jane Jones was Jane Morris when the records were compiled in the 1920s. She died in 1931 aged 93. There is no indication that John Jones was ever married or had any children.

NOTE

Although John Jones seemingly left Llandudno in the mid-1870s, his mother, then Mrs Morris, was still alive and living in Llandudno when the names for the Llandudno Roll of Honour (and other Llandudno memorials) were compiled. It is not known why John Jones of the Mercantile Marine was not included.

 

John (Jack) Jones (RGA)

  • 310095, Driver, 1/1st Welsh (Carnarvonshire) Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery (Territorial Force)
  • Died of wounds, 3 September 1918, aged 26
  • Buried at Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, France
  • CWGC registered (Son of John and Jane Jones, of Tan-y-coed, Nant-y-gamer Rd, Llandudno)

Jack Jones, the son of a stonemason, John Jones and his wife Jane was born circa 1891 at Mochdre. In 1901, the family lived at 5 Mount Pleasant View. Penrhyn. Jack was recorded as being at school – he had a sister Maggie and two brothers, Owen and Thomas. Ten years later, in 1911, the family lived Tan-y-Coed, Nant-y-Gamer, Llandudno and had been joined by Llewellyn, Lily and Alice though by this time, Jack appears to have left the family home and no 1911 Census record for him has yet been found.

Jack Jones’ enlisted at Llandudno and served in the Royal Garrison Artillery, (Territorial Force). When the Volunteer Force became part of the new Territorial Force in 1908, the 1st Carnarvonshire RGA (V) became the 1st Welsh (Carnarvonshire) RGA, with its HQ at Bangor and a dedicated Ammunition Column in the drill hall at Lloyd Street, Llandudno. Jack Jones’ regimental number 310095 was issued in 1917 in a tranche of numbers replacing earlier numbers for soldiers in the Carnarvon Heavy Brigade RGA. Since Jack Jones’ earlier regimental number is not known, then it is difficult to judge when he joined the army though some soldiers with numbers 3100xx had joined up before the war, one as early as 1903. After mobilisation, the battery split into two: the 1/1st for duty overseas and the second-line 2/1st. The Welsh Division (now renamed the 53rd [Welsh] Division), prepared for overseas duty but in the event, only the infantry battalions were deployed (to Gallipoli). On 16 February 1916 the battery went to Woolwich to mobilise for overseas service with the BEF. It embarked at Southampton on 2 March, landing at Le Havre the following day, and joined the 23rd Heavy Artillery Group. It went into action on 17 March 1916.

The 1/1st Welsh Hvy Bty received an extended rest from 27 July to 17 August. The next day it joined in the Allies’ Hundred Days Offensive with the capture of several important ridges, and then a succession of attacks in early September. Jack Jones died of wounds on 3 September 1918 aged 26 at No 2 Canadian Stationary Hospital which was near Boulogne. He was buried at Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille.

 

John Davies Jones

  • 15538, Lance Corporal, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Killed in action, 30 September 1917, aged 26
  • No known grave (Tyne Cot Memorial, Ypres, Belgium)
  • CWGC registered (Son of William Jones, of “Elvira”, Pleasant St, Llandudno)

John Davies Jones was the son of William Jones and his wife Grace Ellen Jones (née Parry). He was born in Llandudno on 9 December 1890. In 1891, the family lived at “The Ivies”, Tan y fron, Llandudno; William Jones was employed as a porter in a wine store. In January 1896, John Jones was recorded in the register of St. George’s National School with his address as “Plas Newydd” (Old Road, Llandudno). Grace Ellen Jones died in 1900 and the census for the following year records William Jones living alone at “Plas Newydd” and described as both a coal merchant and an employer. His son John Davies Jones was living at the home of his uncle, Samuel J Parry at “Bangor House”, Church Walks. In 1911, John lived at the same address though the head of the household was recorded as his aunt, Jane Davies – he was employed as a house painter.

On 9 September 1914, John Jones volunteered at Llandudno to join the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. His service number was 15538 and he was posted to the 10th (Service) Battalion that had formed at Wrexham on 16 October 1914 as part of K3, Kitchener’s third new army. By June 1915, the battalion was at Aldershot and it landed at Boulogne on 27 September 1915. Unfortunately, John Jones’ army record no longer exists but an entry in a regimental roll indicates that he embarked again for France on 15 June 1917, suggesting that he may have received hospital treatment in England.  After spending time at an infantry base depot, he joined the 1st Battalion RWF at Mory on 6 July 1917 in a draft of 100 reinforcements. The date of his promotion to lance corporal is unknown though he was recorded as a private on joining the 1st RWF.

John Davies Jones was killed in action on 30 September 1917 aged 26. It was on this day when the battalion came into the trenches at Polygon Wood near Ypres. The war diary mentions no casualties (apart from 1 to hospital) for that day but it records 27 killed, 67 wounded and four missing on the following day when the Germans attacked in force. The Commonwealth War Grave Commission records two 1st RWF fatalities on 30 September and 29 on 1 November. All but two have no known grave and are commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

 

John Marks Jones

  • 21375, Private, 14th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Killed in action, 18 March 1916, aged 32
  • Buried at Le Touret Military Cemetery, France
  • CWGC registered (Son of Ann Jones, of 2, Pen-y-Ffordd Terrace, Penrhynside, Llandudno, and the late Thomas Jones)
  • Penrhynside casualty

John Marks Jones was born at Conwy in 1883. He was the first child of a joiner and carpenter, Thomas Jones and his wife Ann Jones (née Marks). In 1891, the family lived at 11 Railway Terrace, Conwy, John having been joined by his siblings Henry, Ann and Grace. Ten years later, the family, which now included Thomas, William and Margaret lived at 2 Penyffordd Terrace, Penrhynside, John being employed as a joiner. In 1911, John and his sister Grace, were living in their uncle and aunt’s home at 24 Longwood Avenue, Dublin; John was employed as a joiner in his uncle’s builders’ yard. On 2 February 1914, John M Jones was admitted to the Amalgamated Society of Carpenters & Joiners’ Llandudno Branch.

At the beginning of 1915, John Marks Jones volunteered at Llandudno to join the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He was enlisted into the 14th (Service) Battalion which had formed at Llandudno the previous November. His regimental number was 21375. The battalion was part of the short-lived “Welsh Army” which became the 38th (Welsh) Division. The division moved to Winchester in August 1915 and landed in France in December 1915.

John Marks Jones was killed in action on 18 March 1916 aged 32 whilst his battalion was holding the line near Festubert. The war diary of the battalion does not record any major action that day though it does record some incoming shelling. He was buried at Le Touret Military Cemetery alongside two Llandudno comrades from the same battalion who were killed the following day: Robert Jones and David Parry (both qv).

John’s records use either Mark or Marks as his second name. The latter is correct as his birth was registered as John Marks Jones, Marks being his mother’s maiden name.

 

John William Jones

  • T/356034, Driver, Royal Army Service Corps
  • Died of wounds (gas), 31 December 1920, aged 60
  • Buried at the Great Orme’s Head Cemetery
  • CWGC registered (Husband of Mary Jones, of 4 King’s Rd, West Shore, Llandudno)
  • Llandudno casualty
    • Not on the Llandudno’s Roll of Honour
    • Not on Llandudno War Memorial
    • Not in the Memorial Chapel, of Holy Trinity Church          

John William Jones was born in either Llandudno or Welshpool (the records are contradictory) in 1859. His middle name of “William” only appears in some army documents. Consequently, searching for the name John Jones is difficult and his early life remains elusive. The first reliable record is that of his marriage to Mary Evans from Ilkeston in 1891. The couple’s son Edward was born at Conwy in 1895 and a daughter Edith was born in Llandudno in 1897.  A baptismal register gives the family’s address as 10 Prospect Terrace, Llandudno and John Jones’ occupation as a sailor. A daughter, Emily was born in 1898 and a son John Herbert in 1899.

In 1901, the family’s address was 3 Pen-y-Ffrith, Llandudno and the Census gave John’s occupation as a foreman at the sewage works. Daughters Mary, Sarah and Anne were born in 1902, 1905 and circa 1909 respectively. The reason why there is a four-year gap between the last two children is because in December 1904, John Jones had deserted his family and gone back to sea, returning home in January 1909. Not having contributed anything towards his wife and children who had lived off the charity of the Conway Union, he was sentenced to one month’s imprisonment with hard labour. In 1911, John was recorded as a general labourer employed by the Llandudno UDC and the family lived at “Bron Berllan Cottage”, Tynycoed Road.

A newspaper advertisement dated January 1917 reveals that the Army Service Corps was recruiting drivers for mechanical transport from men aged 19 to 50 and passed for Category A (able to perform any service in the army) but not eligible for enlistment. Whether John Jones was responding to this advertisement is unknown, but he enlisted into the Army Service Corps as a driver on 2 June 1917. At around 57 years of age he was considerably overage. He was given the number T/356034. Nothing is known about his army service except that he was gassed and discharged on 12 March 1919 by which time his corps had been prefixed with the word “Royal”. He was awarded a Silver War Badge number B257589 which indicated that he had been honourably discharged.

John Jones died on 31 December 1920 aged 60 at the Ministry of Pensions’ Hospital, Bangor (formerly Bangor Military Hospital). The cause of death was recorded on his death certificate as aortic disease of the heart and syncope (fainting). Commonwealth War Grave Commission records indicate his death was because of being gassed. He was not the only Llandudno victim of gassing who eventually succumbed to heart disease. His body was returned to Llandudno and was buried at the Great Orme’s Head Cemetery. CWGC records give his home address as 4 King’s Road, West Shore, Llandudno.

NOTE

Even though John Jones’ died because of being gassed and is buried in a registered war grave, his name is not commemorated on any known war memorial in Llandudno or elsewhere.

 

Llewelyn Jones

  • 31505, Private, 8th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Died of wounds, 26 January 1917, aged 21
  • Buried at Amara War Cemetery, Iraq
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)
  • Deganwy casualty

Llewelyn Jones was born on 18 April 1895 at Conwy. He was the son of William Jones, a plasterer, and his wife Ann. In 1901, the family lived at 2 Rathbone Terrace, Deganwy, Llewelyn being the ninth of the 10 children recorded that year. Llewelyn attended Deganwy National School. By 1911, the family had moved to 4 Park Terrace, Deganwy, Llewelyn being employed as a shop assistant to a grocer.

Now employed as a porter and ticket collector at Deganwy Station, Llewelyn Jones joined the army on 5 September 1914, enlisting at Llandudno. He was posted to the 2nd Reserve Regiment of Cavalry on 14 October 1914 with a regimental number of 4329. This Reserve Regiment had formed at Aldershot in August 1914. Llewelyn was not fated to join a cavalry unit for on 15 June 1915 he was transferred to the infantry, specifically the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Litherland. His new regimental number was 31505. After a few weeks’ infantry training, he was posted on 23 August 1915 to the 8th (Service) Battalion RWF. The 8th RWF was the first of this Regiment’s Service Battalions, forming at Wrexham in August 1914. Under the orders of the 40th Brigade, 13th (Western) Division, the battalion fought at Gallipoli which is where Llewelyn joined it in a draft of reinforcements. In January 1916, the 13th Division was evacuated and by the end of the month it was concentrated at Port Said, guarding the Suez Canal. On 12 February, the Division moved to Mesopotamia as part of the force assembled to relieve the besieged garrison at Kut-El-Amara. Llewelyn embarked at Port Said on 14 February and disembarked at Basra a fortnight later. By 27 March 1916, the 13th Division had assembled near Sheikh Sa’ad. Llewelyn was admitted to hospital on 17 June and was discharged on 6 October 1916, rejoining his unit the following day at Amara.

As part of the second battle of Kut, the 40th Brigade, which included the 8th RWF, attacked enemy trenches at the Hai Salient on 25 January 1917. That day, the Brigade lost 40 officers and 282 other ranks. It is possible that Llewelyn was wounded during this engagement for, on the following day, he died aged 21 of a gunshot wound to his left hip at No 16 Casualty Clearing Station. He was buried at Amara War Cemetery.

In 1933, all the headstones were removed from the cemetery when it was discovered that salts in the ground were causing them to deteriorate. Instead, a wall was erected with the names of all those known to be buried in the cemetery engraved upon it. Sadly, the current political climate in Iraq has made it impossible to maintain the cemetery which has been abandoned and desecrated. Consequently, the 3696 known casualties in the Amara War Cemetery are held at the headquarters of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission in the Iraq Roll of Honour.

 

Percy Allsup Jones

  • 87950, Private, 13th The King’s (Liverpool Regiment)
  • Killed in action, 21 August 1918, aged 20
  • Buried at Railway Cutting Cemetery, Courcelles-le-Comte, France
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)

Percy Allsup Jones was born at Llandegai on 21 July 1898. He was the son of Thomas Inman Jones, a civil engineer and architect and Sarah Jane Jones (formerly Roberts née Allsup). In 1901, the family lived at 40 College Road, Bangor and Percy was then recorded as having two brothers, George J Jones (born George Jeffrey Roberts, later George Allsup Jones) and William. In 1903, Percy was admitted to St. George’s School, Llandudno and his address was the Gresham Hotel. Newspaper reports relate a problem with the licence at the hotel and the family moved to the Ship Inn, Abergele later in the year. The family returned to Llandudno and in 1906, Percy enrolled in the Lloyd Street School, Llandudno, giving his address as “Ashby House”, Trinity Street. In 1911, the family lived at “Annedale”, Trinity Street; Thomas Jones was retired, and Sarah Jones was a boarding house keeper. In 1911, Percy undertook the examination for a scholarship to John Bright County School, but the school registers indicate that in 1912, he attended the Central School, Llandudno. He left in 1913 and later lived in Rhyl, working in the Income Tax office.

Percy probably enlisted in 1916 (at Bangor) and joined a Training Reserve Battalion around February 1917. He disembarked in France circa September 1917 and was posted to the 13th (Service) Battalion of The King’s (Liverpool Regiment) with a new regimental number of 87950. The 13th KLR had formed at Seaforth in September 1914, disembarking at Le Havre in September 1915.

Percy Allsup Jones was killed in action on 21 August 1918 aged 20 when the battalion was attacking Courcelles-le-Comte, a little to the south of Arras. A local newspaper reported that he was going over the top and was shot through the head. This offensive is now known as the Third Battle of Albert. He was buried at Railway Cutting Cemetery.

The newspaper report mentioned above also stated that Percy’s brother, (Thomas) Inman Jones, had been recorded missing and the worst was feared. Fortunately, he had been taken prisoner. He died in 1972.

NOTE

Percy A Jones’ second name was frequently recorded as “Allsop”. However, his maternal grandfather was George Jeffrey Allsup which confirms Percy’s unusual second name.

 

Richard Edward Jones

  • 1005, Private, 2/1st Denbighshire Hussars Yeomanry (Territorial Force)
  • Died of illness, 26 April 1915, aged 22
  • Buried in St. Tudno’s Churchyard
  • CWGC registered (Son of William and Margaret Jones, of Combermere, Deganwy Avenue, Llandudno)

Richard Edward Jones was born in Llandudno on 7 November 1892. His parents were William and Margaret Jones who in the 1891 Census were recorded as living at “Combermere House”, Deganwy Street (Avenue after 1910). They were described as a coachman groom and a lodging-house keeper respectively. Richard had six siblings: William, Elizabeth, Sarah, Griffith, Ellen and Mary. Richard Jones was educated at St. George’s National School from April 1896, leaving in July 1907. In 1911, William Jones was described as a carriage proprietor and Richard, a tailor. The Jones’ family were prominent congregants of St. George’s Church.

Richard Edward Jones’ service records are scant but estimating from his serial number in the Denbighshire Hussars Yeomanry, he joined up around November 1914. He enlisted in Llandudno where most volunteers were recruited into the new service battalions of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Why Richard Jones joined the 2/1st Denbighshire Hussars, part of the Territorial Force, is unknown but perhaps it was because of a familiarity with horses. The 2/1st DHY served in Northumberland.

Richard Edward Jones’ war was a short one for on 26 April 1915, he died of pneumonia at the Red Cross Hospital, Red Court, Llandudno aged 22. He was buried in St. Tudno’s Churchyard four days later.

 

Robert Jones

  • 20006, Private, 14th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Killed in action, 19 March 1916, aged 32
  • Buried at Le Touret Military Cemetery, Richebourg-L’avoue, France
  • CWGC registered (Son of Mrs E Jones, of Park House, Mostyn St, Llandudno, and the late Mr J M Jones; husband of Maud Lilian Jones, of 37 Scott St, Bootle, Liverpool)

Robert Jones was the eldest son of John Morris Jones and Elizabeth Jones (née Edwards). He was born on 27 June 1882 at Llanrwst. John Morris Jones was a general labourer. In 1891, the family lived at “Bramley Cottage”, Craig-y-Don and in that year, Robert transferred from St. Beuno’s School to St. George’s National School. Ten years later, the family lived at “Golden Grove”, Craig Side and in 1911, Robert was living with his parents at “Park House”, Mostyn Street, Llandudno. He was described as a window-cleaner and an employer. On 25 April 1912, Robert Jones married Maud Lilian Jessey at St. Leonard’s Church, Bootle and their daughter Elizabeth Winifred was born on 27 February 1913.

Robert Jones joined the Royal Welch Fusiliers in November 1914. He enlisted at Llandudno and was given the regimental number 20006. His unit was the 14th (Service) Battalion that was forming at Llandudno. The battalion moved to Winchester in August 1915 and disembarked at Le Havre on 2 December 1915.

Robert Jones was killed in action on 19 March 1916 near Festubert aged 32. He was buried at Le Touret Military Cemetery. David Parry (qv) of the same battalion was also killed on this day and has an adjacent grave.

Commonwealth War Grave Commission records show that Maud Jones’ address after the war was 37 Scott Street, Bootle, Liverpool. In 1939, Maud was working as a cook at Greaves Hall TB Hospital, near Southport. She died in 1951.

 

Robert Jones (PC)

  • 1242, Private, 5th (Reserve) Battalion, Guards Machine Gun Regiment
  • Died of illness after discharge, 13 November 1918, aged 25
  • Buried at Pentrefelin (Tabor) Congregational Chapelyard
  • CWGC registered (Son of Evan and Mary Jones, of Brynhyfryd, Pentrefelin)

Robert Jones, the son of Evan Jones, an agricultural labourer, and his wife Mary was born circa 1892 at Pentrefelin. In 1901, the family lived at “Brynhyfryd”, Pentrefelin: Evan Jones was now a quarryman. Ten years later, Robert Jones was still living at the home of his parents. On a date unknown, Robert Jones joined the Carnarvonshire Constabulary and is known to have been stationed at Caernarvon as No 82.

Robert Jones enlisted into the army at Bangor on 25 November 1915. A week previously he had been medically examined at the Military Hospital, Bangor and was recorded as being six feet in height, weighed 160 lb and had good physical development. His police background and physique made him a suitable candidate to enter the Guards and he joined the Welsh Guards at Caterham on 27 November 1915 with a regimental number of 2246. He embarked from Southampton on 23 September 1916 for service with the Machine Gun Company, 3rd Guards Brigade in France to which he had been attached. The 3rd Guards Brigade had formed in France in August 1915 and included the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, the Machine Gun Company forming the following month. It would appear that Robert did not join the company until 22 January 1917. On 18 June 1917, whilst serving on the Somme, he was admitted to 3 Field Ambulance with exhaustion and was evacuated to England by hospital ship on 29 June 1917. Robert spent the next few months in and out of hospital diagnosed with Addison’s disease and trench fever. By May 1918, the machine gun companies of the Guards Division had been absorbed by the Guards Machine Gun Regiment and Robert Jones was given the new regimental number of 1242 and administered by the 5th (Reserve) Battalion. He was discharged from the army on 4 October 1918 as physically unfit for war service. He was awarded the Silver War Badge number B18125.

Robert Jones died of influenza leading to bronchopneumonia on 13 November 1918 at 37 High Street, Caernarfon. A local newspaper reporting his death noted that he was about to resume his duties in the Carnarvonshire Constabulary. He was buried at Pentrefelin (Tabor) Congregational Chapelyard.

 

Robert Thomas Jones

  • 162656, Private 2nd Class, Royal Air Force
  • Accidentally killed after discharge, 19 April 1920, aged 29
  • Buried at Llanrhos Churchyard
  • CWGC registered (seemingly in error) (Son of Mrs Elizabeth Jones of 10 Augusta Street, Llandudno)

Robert Thomas Jones, the son of Thomas Benjamin Jones, a joiner, and his wife Elizabeth Jones (née Meredith) was born in Llandudno on 16 November 1890. In 1891, the family lived at “Rhianna”, Chapel Street, Llandudno, Robert having an elder sister Catherine Ann. Robert attended Lloyd Street School, the register for 1898 recording his address as in Lloyd Street. The Census of Wales for 1901 confirms the family’s address as “Silverdale”, Lloyd Street. Robert left school in February 1904. The following year the local press reported that Thomas Benjamin Jones had deserted his family. This situation is reflected in the Census of 1911 which records Elizabeth Jones as being the head of the family but still married; the family lived at “Rock View”, Tygwyn Road, Llandudno. Robert was employed as a porter for a drapery establishment.

Robert enlisted into the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He was considered medically fit at Llandudno on 4 September 1914 and joined the regimental depot at Wrexham the following day with a regimental number of 14539. He was never posted to a battalion for he was discharged as medically unfit on 13 October 1914, being unable to march due to ankylosis of an ankle. Undeterred, Robert Jones enlisted into the Welsh Regiment on 17 July 1915. His new regimental number was 38525 and he joined the 9th (Service) Battalion. This battalion had formed at Cardiff in September 1914 and disembarked at Boulogne in July 1915, though Robert did not disembark until 17 December 1915 and joined the battalion a few days later in the rank of lance corporal. On a date unknown, Robert was evacuated to England and put on the strength of the 12th (Reserve) Battalion before being discharged on 7 July 1916 for reason of sickness. He was awarded a Silver War Badge number 142273. Still undeterred, Robert Jones enlisted into the Royal Air Force on 1 May 1918 with a service number of 162656 in the rank of private 2nd class.

On 25 July 1918, Robert Jones married Margaret Smith at Conwy, their child, Robert Sidney Jones, having been born on 19 December 1917. Margaret’s address was recorded as 9 Craig-y-Don Parade, Llandudno. From 9 August 1918 until 20 January 1919, Robert served with No 7 Anti-aircraft Park. He was discharged 14 March 1919 as medically unfit for further duty. His address on discharge was 10 Augusta Street, Llandudno.

Robert Thomas Jones was accidentally killed on 19 April 1920 aged 29 at the Brig-y-Don Hotel, Llandudno and an inquest was held two days later. The cause of death on his death certificate reads: “while deceased was window cleaning, the ladder on which he was working slipped and he was precipitated to the basement below – severe head injuries – few minutes. Accidental death.” His address was given as 7 King’s Road, Llandudno. Robert was buried at Llanrhos Churchyard.

NOTE

Robert Thomas Jones was accidentally killed after being discharged from the armed forces. Though he has a registered war grave at Llanrhos Churchyard, he is not commemorated locally. The anomaly may have arisen when Llanrhos Churchyard was surveyed by the authorities and Robert was mistakenly identified as having died of an attributable cause.

 

Thomas Jones

  • Private, Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Llanrhos casualty

Thomas Jones is recorded both on the Llanrhos (Remainder of Parish) War Memorial and inside St. Paul’s Church, Craig-y-Don.

The HistoryPoints website, quoting local knowledge, records that Thomas Jones was a private in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. The website adds that Thomas Jones was married, lived in Llanrhos and worked as a gardener at Tyn-y-Coed (a convalescent home) before enlisting.

No additional material evidence has been discovered.

 

Thomas Allen Jones

  • 37044, Private, 15th Royal Welsh Fusiliers
  • Killed in action, 10 July 1916, aged 28
  • No known grave (Thiepval Memorial, France)
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)

Thomas Allen Jones was born in 1888 in Dodleston, near Chester. He was the son of Thomas and Anne Jones. In 1891, the family lived at Lower Kinnerton and Thomas Jones (senior) was described as a labourer. Ten years later, the family was living at Waen near St. Asaph; Thomas (senior) was described as a farm bailiff. In 1911, Thomas Jones (junior) was a grocer’s assistant and worked and boarded at EB Jones & Co, Pioneer Stores, 2 Gloddaeth Street, Llandudno.

On 22 November 1915, Thomas Jones joined the 20th (Reserve) Battalion of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Conwy. The battalion was based at Kinmel Park. He gave his home address as “Fachwen Farm”, Waen, St. Asaph and his occupation as a manager of a grocery. He disembarked at Boulogne on 26 May 1916 and arrived at the 38th Infantry Base Depot at Étaples the following day. He joined the 15th (Service) Battalion (1st London Welsh) on 19 June 1916. The 15th Battalion had been in France since December 1915.

Thomas Jones was reported missing in action on 10 or 11 July 1916 during the attack on Mametz Wood during the Battle of Albert, a phase of the Battle of the Somme. For official purposes, his date of death is given as 10 July. He was 28 years of age.

Thomas’ fiancé, Nellie Roberts, made a fruitless enquiry to the Red Cross to ascertain if he had been taken as a prisoner of war. He left his effects and estate of £133 1s 4d to Nellie.

 

Thomas Ivor Jones

  • 266380, Private, 1/6th Royal Welsh Fusiliers (Territorial Force)
  • Died of wounds, 6 November 1917, aged 19
  • Buried at Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel
  • CWGC registered (Son of Robert and Sarah Ellen Jones, of York Villa, Clifton Rd, Llandudno)
  • Brother of Alun Jones

Thomas Ivor Jones, the son of Robert and Sarah Ellen Jones, was born in Llandudno on 6 December 1897.  In 1901, the family of the couple and five sons including Alun (qv) and Thomas Ivor lived at “Ringwood House”, Deganwy Street; Robert Jones was a shopkeeper. Thomas Ivor Jones (as Ivor) is recorded as attending Lloyd Street School. In 1911, the family lived at “York Villa”, Clifton Road, Llandudno; Robert Jones was employed as a grocer and Thomas as at school. Thomas left school that year “for work”.

Thomas Jones, now a draper’s assistant, volunteered at Llandudno to join the army under the Derby Scheme on 7 December 1915. He claimed to be 19 years of age though in fact he enlisted one day after his 18th birthday. He was given a day’s pay and put into the Army Reserve. He was called up 29 January 1916 and joined the 6th Reserve Battalion (3/6th), Royal Welsh Fusiliers, (Territorial Force) with a regimental number of 3885. He passed a machine gunners’ course on 11 February 1916. Thomas embarked for Egypt on 11 December 1916 and landed at Alexandria 15 days later. He joined the 1/6th Battalion RWF Territorial Force at El Ferdan (Suez Canal) on 31 December 1916. Sometime in 1917, he was renumbered 266380.

On 6 November 1917, during the Battle of Tel el Khuweilfe, Palestine, Thomas was dangerously wounded in action with a gunshot wound to the abdomen. He was evacuated by the 3rd Welsh Field Ambulance and died the same day at No 75 Casualty Clearing Station. Commonwealth War Grave Commission records indicate that he was 21 years of age when he died but he was in fact a month shy of his 20th birthday. He was buried at Beersheba War Cemetery.

 

Trevor Pritchard Jones

  • 4171, Private, 20th Australian Infantry
  • Died of illness after discharge, 6 April 1919, aged 22
  • Buried at the Coast Hospital Cemetery, Little Bay, New South Wales, Australia
  • Not an official war grave
    • Died of a non-attributable illness after discharge

Trevor Pritchard Jones was born in Llandudno on 16 August 1896. He was the son of Hugh Jones, a gentlemen’s outfitter, and his wife Jane. In 1901 the family lived at 145 Mostyn Street, Llandudno; Trevor had an elder brother Harold and a younger sister Nesta. In September 1903, Trevor was admitted to Lloyd Street School, his home address now recorded as “Vardre View”. In 1911, the family’s address was “Bryn Llwyd”, St. Mary’s Road; Trevor was recorded as still being at school and had two additional siblings: John William and Gwyneth.

Trevor became a sales assistant at the jewellery shop of Morris Wartski. On 21 January 1914, Trevor was in the dock of Caernarvon Crown Court charged with stealing from his employer. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to six months imprisonment. After release, Trevor joined the crew of the three-masted iron sailing ship SV Neotsfield. Exactly when he sailed is unknown but the Neotsfield was recorded as signing on a crew in New South Wales in February 1915. Trevor signed on as a cabin boy on the Alice on 23 June 1915.

On 6 October 1915, Trevor Jones was enlisted into the 20th Australian Infantry Battalion (10th Reinforcement) at Holdsworthy, New South Wales with a service number of 4171. He gave his next of kin as his mother whose address was “Parade House”, North Parade, Llandudno. Giving his occupation as a steward, he neglected to inform the authorities of his previous conviction. He sailed from Sydney on 11 March 1916 on HMAT Orsova to Egypt and embarked from Alexandria on HT Scotian on 9 May 1916, joining the 20th Battalion in France on 27 July 1916. On 4 August 1916, he was wounded in action with a gunshot wound to the head. He was evacuated to England on 18 August 1916 and spent time at Edmonton Military Hospital; No 1 Australian Auxiliary Hospital, Harefield Park, Middlesex and No 2 Australian Auxiliary Hospital, Southall, Middlesex. He was discharged on 23 November 1916 to No 2 Command Depot at Weymouth. On 12 February 1917, Trevor Jones sailed from Devonport on HMAT Benalla arriving at Melbourne on 10 April 1917; he was discharged on 9 May 1917. On applying for a pension, he gave his address as 12 Mann Street, Miller’s Point, Sydney and was granted £3 per fortnight as from his date of discharge.

Trevor Pritchard Jones died of pneumonic influenza after one day on 6 April 1919 aged 22 at the Coast Hospital (Fourth Australian Repatriation Hospital). He was buried the following day at the hospital’s cemetery. A notice in the Sydney Morning Herald records that his address was 24 Argyle Place, Miller’s Point.

NOTE

Because Trevor Pritchard Jones died of a non-attributable illness after discharge, his grave at the Coast Hospital Cemetery (now a historical site) is not an official war grave. Nevertheless, he is remembered on the Llandudno memorials.

 

William Jones (BR)

  • 17692, Private, 7th Border Regiment
  • Died 9 January 1916, aged 28
  • Buried at Wimereux Communal Cemetery, France
  • CWGC registered (Son of David and Elizabeth Jones of 10 Park Terrace, Deganwy, Llandudno, Carnarvonshire)
  • Deganwy casualty

William Jones, the son of a coachman/groom, David Jones and his wife Elizabeth Jones was born at Llandudno on 22 February 1887. In 1891, the family lived at Llanrhos (house name unreadable) and William had three elder siblings at the time: Ellen, Johnny and Thomas. In October 1897, William was admitted to the National School at Deganwy, his previous school having been Llanrhos School. His family address in the school register was recorded as 5 Park Terrace, Deganwy. In May 1898, he transferred back to Llanrhos School and in 1901 William and his mother were recorded as living at 2 Farmers Cottages, Llanrhos, William being employed as a stable boy. No census record for 1911 has been found. His parents were then living at 8 Park Terrace, Deganwy.

Giving his home of Deganwy, William Jones joined the Border Regiment at Liverpool in mid-November 1914. Reporting to the regimental depot at Carlisle, he was given the regimental number of 17692 and a few days later was posted to the 7th (Service) Battalion which was forming at the time. The 7th BR was a component of Kitchener’s Second New Army or K2. The battalion was based at Andover, Bovington and Winchester before landing at Boulogne on 15 July 1915. On 14 December 1915, William James received shrapnel wounds to his thigh when the battalion was in the front line on the Ypres-Roulers railway.

William Jones was evacuated by 51 Field Ambulance and other units to No 8 Stationary Hospital at Wimereux, about three miles north of Boulogne. He died of his wounds on 9 January 1916 aged 28 and was buried in Wimereux Communal Cemetery.

 

William Jones (CI)

  • 3030579, Private, 116th Battalion Canadian Infantry
  • Killed in action, 27 August 1918, aged 32
  • Buried at Vis-en-Artois British Cemetery, Haucourt, France
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)

William Jones was the son of a plasterer Christmas Jones and his wife Elizabeth Jones (née Williams). He was born on 1 December 1885 at Llandudno.  In 1891 the family lived at Pen-y-Frydd Cottages, William being recorded as having an elder brother Thomas and a younger sister Jane. From that year, William attended St. George’s National School. Ten years later, the same family group lived at 1 Tan-y-Graig, Great Orme’s Head – William worked as a grocer’s packer. Christmas Jones travelled at least a couple of times to visit family or friends in Jersey City, New Jersey, USA and on 18 June 1910, William Jones disembarked from the ill-fated Lusitania at New York also bound for Jersey City.

On 5 June 1917, William completed a draft registration card. He gave his address as 2907, Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois and that he was an unemployed plasterer. He also stated that he had declared an intention to become a naturalised citizen of the USA. However, still a British citizen, he went to Toronto in Canada to join the Canadian Expeditionary Force, attesting on 19 September 1917 and joining the 1st Depot Battalion of the Central Ontario Regiment. After his training but at a date unknown, William Jones arrived in France and joined the 116th Infantry Battalion (2nd Central Ontario Regiment). His regimental number was 3030579. The battalion had disembarked in France on 11 February 1917.

William Jones was killed in action on 27 August 1918 aged 32. This was the second day of what became known as the Battle of the Scarpe (1918) when the 116th Battalion’s objective was Boiry-Notre Dame to the east of Arras. Whilst advancing with his platoon, he was hit in the head by a machine gun bullet and killed instantly. He was initially buried south-east of Monchy-le-Preux but in 1919, he was re-interred at Vis-en-Artois British Cemetery.

 

William Edward Clarke Jones

  • 14801, Serjeant, 9th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment
  • Died of wounds, 9 July 1916, aged 26
  • Buried at Puchevillers British Cemetery, France
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)

William Edward Clarke Jones was born in Llandudno Junction on 19 November 1889. He was the son of a plumber and glazier, John William Jones and his wife Martha Emily. In 1891, the family boarded at 4 Tudno Street, Llandudno. William attended St. George’s National School. In 1901, the family was living at 12 Jubilee Street, Llandudno. By 1911, the family had moved to 23 Lord Duncan Street, Salford. William was employed as a brass turner. He also served a four-year engagement with the 7th Lancashire Fusiliers, a Territorial Force battalion based at Salford.

On the outbreak of war, William’s engagement with the 7th Lancs had been completed. He re-enlisted at Manchester on 8 September 1914 into the Reserve Battalion of the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. He re-joined the colours on 22 September and on 26 September he was promoted to serjeant and posted to the 9th (Service) Battalion, part of Kitchener’s 3rd New Army. By December 1914, the battalion had moved to billets in Christchurch, later transferring to Southbourne, Romsey and Aldershot (June 1915). On 26 September 1915, the battalion landed at Boulogne.

William Jones was accidentally wounded in action on 21 October 1915 but remained at duty. He was wounded again by a mine explosion on 3 December 1915 and sent to hospital at Dieppe. He returned to duty on 16 December 1915. He was wounded in action for the third time on 7 July 1916 with gunshot wounds near Ovillers-la-Boisselle during the Battle of the Somme. He died two days later at the 44th Casualty Clearing Station at Puchevillers aged 26. He is interred at Puchevillers British Cemetery, France.

 

William Oliver Jones

  • 40657, Private, 7th Suffolk Regiment
  • Killed in action, 9 August 1917, aged 33
  • No known grave (Arras Memorial, France)
  • CWGC registered (no family details noted)

William Oliver Jones, the son of Edward and Mary Ellen Jones, was born in Llandudno on 5 August 1884. He was the second of his parents’ nine children. Edward Jones was the Welsh Wesleyan pastor in Llandudno from 1882 until 1885 after which he took up duties at Llanasa, Flintshire. In 1891 the family lived at “Glynafon”, Talysarn. Ten years later, William was living at 7 & 9 High Street, Portmadoc and described as a draper’s assistant. In 1909, William married Margaret Wellings and their first daughter Margaret Eleanor was born on 15 September 1909. According to her baptismal record, the family resided at “St. Garmons”, Trevor Street, Llandudno. In 1911, William, Margaret, Margaret Eleanor and a second daughter, Mary Gwendoline, born on 2 January 1911, lived at 5 Royd Terrace, Colwyn Bay. A son, Edward Arthur Jones, was born on 9 October 1912 and a daughter, Doris, was born on 4 April 1915.

William Jones enlisted at Llandudno into a Territorial Force battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment. Direct enlistment into a Territorial battalion would have been unlikely after December 1915 so it appears that William enlisted in late 1915. Called up in mid-1916, he joined one of the third-line battalions, either the 3/5th or the 3/6th which had formed the previous year and moved to Catterick in Yorkshire. His regimental number was 2619. The Military Service Act of 1916 deemed that all men in the Territorial Force were available for service overseas. Whilst some entire Territorial Force battalions were mobilised for service overseas, others were trawled for soldiers as reinforcements for other battalions. William Jones was transferred to the Suffolk Regiment in September 1916 and given the regimental number of 40657. He was posted to the 7th (Service) Battalion in France the following month.

On 9 August 1917, the 7th Suffolk’s was in the front line near Arras. Early in the morning, the battalion withdrew so the front lines could be bombarded by artillery prior to raids being launched into the German trenches with “a view to killing any survivors, identifying information and destroying dugouts.” The plan was executed and judged successful though the price, according to Commonwealth War Grave Commission records, was the death that day of 39 men from the battalion. Of those 39, 29 have no known grave, including William Oliver Jones aged 33.

Margaret Jones married Samuel William Hadley in Staffordshire in 1922. She died in 1978.

NOTE

William Oliver Jones is commemorated at Coven Memorial Hall and at St. Paul’s Church, Coven alongside his brothers-in-law: Edwin and Henry Wellings. Although Margaret Wellings came from Shropshire, her parents moved to Staffordshire between 1911 and 1919 where her father, Henry Wellings died at Four Ashes, a mile or so from St. Paul’s Church at Coven. William Oliver Jones may have chosen to join the South Staffordshire Regiment to be closer to his wife and children.

 

William Thomas Jones

Possibly Thomas John Williams.

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